RRSP Deposit vs. Mortgage Repayment

Determining whether to contribute to an RRSP or pay down a mortgage has always been a great debate, for each have their advantages. To begin with, an RRSP contribution is tax-deductible, and it can generate a tax refund for you or it can reduce your income tax liability. In addition, an RRSP will continue to grow and accumulate without taxation, meaning you will accumulate more over similar taxable investments. On the other hand, while paying against the principle of a mortgage is not tax deductible, it does reduce the cost of the mortgage over the long term; however, interest on a mortgage is not tax deductible either.

When determining what works best for you, either contributing to an RRSP or paying down a mortgage, we do a series of calculations comparing RRSP contributions and accumulations versus mortgage payments and accumulations. To do this, total RRSP investments accumulated at retirement age are compared using two approaches: making the RRSP contribution, or making the mortgage repayment and using the subsequent savings from the mortgage towards RRSP contributions once the mortgage is paid off. This intricate analysis is best done by a financial planner to ensure the figures used are accurate and specific to your individual case.

When doing an analysis like this, we would look at the following:

  • Current outstanding balance on your mortgage
  • Current mortgage interest rate
  • Assumed long term mortgage interest rate
  • Rights under your mortgage to make payments against the principal
  • RRSP carryforward room
  • Annual RRSP room created
  • Assumed long term rate of return in the RRSP
  • Your marginal tax bracket

An example:

Arianna (age 35) would like to figure out if she should contribute to $5,000 to her RRSP or put the same after-tax equivalent $3,000 (40% tax rate) against her mortgage.

If Arianna applies $5,000 to her RRSP contribution, the investment would accumulate to $22,338.72 by age 65 assuming 5% rate of return compounded monthly.

Alternatively, she can apply $3,000 against her current mortgage of $500,000 with an amortization of 20 years and interest rate of 4%. Her current mortgage payment is $3,029.90 (Pre-tax equivalent: $5,049.83).

By doing this, she reduces her amortization period by 2 months, making her new amortization period to 19.8 years. She then redirects her mortgage payment of $5,049.83 to her RRSP for the next 2 months at 5% rate of return, she would accumulate $18,009.40 by age 65.

In this example, she would be better off contributing to her RRSP.

It is likely that these assumptions will vary in the future and could change the outcome of the analysis. Please consult us before making a decision.

In reality, you can also do a combination of the 2 approaches, for instance by contributing to your RRSP, you can use the tax refund to pay down your mortgage, this way you can get the benefits of both strategies.

BC Budget Highlights 2018

BC Finance Minister Carole James delivered the province’s 2018 budget update on February 20, 2018. The budget anticipates a surplus of $219 million for the current year, $281 million for 2019 and $284 million in 2020.

Corporate and personal tax rates remain unchanged.

The biggest changes are:

  • Elimination of Medical Services Plan (MSP Premiums) effective January 1, 2020
  • Addition of the Employer Health Tax (EHT)
  • Provincial Property Taxes
  • Childcare

The Employer Health Tax and Medical Services Plan premiums:

Effective January 1, 2020, the Medical Services Premium (MSP) will be eliminated. In last year’s budget update, MSP was reduced by 50% effective January 1, 2018. Starting in 2019, the budget introduces the Employer Health Tax (EHT). The EHT is to help fund the elimination of the MSP premiums.

The Employer Health Tax will be calculated as a percentage of payroll:

Provincial Property Transfer Taxes

Effective February 21, 2018, the following will occur:

  • The provincial property transfer taxes (PTT) will increase to 5% (from 3%) on residential property values above $3 million.
  • The PPT applies to foreign purchasers of residential properties in BC will increase to 20% (from 15%) and the tax will extend to include the Fraser Valley, Capital, Nanaimo and Central Okanagan Regional Districts.
  • There is a new speculation tax on residential property in BC. This tax is targeted at foreign and domestic homeowners who don’t pay income tax in BC. Starting in 2018, it’s a rate of $5/$1,000 of assessed value, in 2019, this will increase to $20/$1,000.

Childcare

There will be a new affordable child care benefit that will reduce child care costs by up to $1,250 per month per child by 2020. The new benefit will apply in September 2018. Families with pre-tax incomes of $45,000 or less will receive the full benefit, (up to the cost of care) while those who make up to $111,000 will receive a reduced amount, scaling based on income. The government will be releasing an online benefit calculator to help parents budget.

The budget will provide up to $350/month directly to licensed child care providers to reduce fees. They will be the following:

  • Up to $350/month for group infant/toddler care
  • Up to $200/month for family infant/toddler care
  • Up to $100/month for group care for children aged 3-5
  • Up to $60/month for family care for children aged 3-5

To learn how these changes will affect you, please don’t hesitate to contact us.